TCC Schedule

Schedule

Monday, October 24th

Legislative update:  9:00am – 11:00am

Opening ceremony: 2:00pm – 3:00pm

Breakout Session: 3:15pm – 5:00pm

Tuesday, October 25th

General Session: TCLEDDS Overview – 9:00am – 10:15am

BREAK: 10:15am – 10:45am

General Session: Secure Share/Background Investigations Overview – 10:45am – 12:00pm

Breakout Session:  1:00pm – 2:45pm

BREAK: 2:45pm – 3:15pm

Breakout Session: 3:15pm – 5:00pm

Wednesday, October 26th

Commission meeting: 9:00am –11:00am

Breakout Session: 1:00pm – 2:45pm

BREAK: 2:45pm – 3:15pm

Breakout Session: 3:15pm – 5:00pm

Thursday, October 27th

BREAK: 8:00am

Breakout Session: 9:15am – 11:00am

 

Breakout Sessions

Conflict Solutions and Active Listening – Corporal Kimberlee Jones and Corporal John Willhelm, Lubbock Police Department

During this course, the student will review the basic models of active listening skills. The student will have the opportunity to practice those active listening skills in a classroom environment. The student will receive feedback from fellow officers and instructors to assist them in improving their active listening skills. The student will also learn about different types of conflict, how conflict occurs, how officers become involved in situations where conflict has occurred, and how active listening skills can assist in resolving conflict.

TCOLE Presents: From Fundamentals to Futuristic Approaches – Malcolm Jackson and Mike Dickey

The last couple of years identified our need to reorient ourselves to the basic mission and goals of successful law enforcement training while looking for new and innovative approaches that yield effective results.  The planned program includes a look at overcoming some common challenges, as well as exploring ideas on developing future training excellence for peace officers, jailers and telecommunicators.  The program topics include building strong learning objectives, developing quality lesson plans, facilitating successful advisory boards, implementing quality assessments, maintaining training records, understanding and complying with both the TCOLE rules and your written contract agreement, and ideas on collaboration and the use of technology throughout your training program.  

Physical Fitness in the Academy Setting – Texas Department of Public Safety, Fitness Wellness Unit

Many different approaches to the topic of physical fitness in the academy and beyond have been attempted. Despite previous efforts, law enforcement officers still suffer from disproportional rates of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. With these risks, police officers have reduced job effectiveness, proven increase in personal and agency liability, and substantially reduced life expectancy1. The Texas Department of Public Safety has taken the lead in successfully mitigating these risks with a comprehensive and award-winning program of physical fitness testing and assessment, wellness, resiliency, and nutrition. Details about this progressive, rigorous, and result driven physical fitness program not only for incumbents but incoming Trooper Trainees will be discussed along with steps that any agency can utilize to adopt components into their program for incumbents and trainees.

1.  Violanti, J.M., Fekedulegn, D., Shi, M. and Andrew, M.E. (2020). Hidden danger: A 22-years analysis of law enforcement deaths associated with duty-related illnesses (1997–2018). Policing: An International Journal, 43(2), 330-344.https://doi.org/10.1108/PIJPSM-07-2019-0109

Train, the Trainer – Lana Gudgel, Heart of Texas Council of Governments

The focus of the Train, the Trainer, is to develop the trainer’s ability to enhance the law enforcement training by delivering it in a manner that permanently imprints the most desirable responses at the officer’s subconscious level and the most effective programs for success. Training must be meaningful, challenging, rewarding, and build on the strengths and talents officers already possess. Train the trainer provides trainers with simple, proven strategies for accomplishing this mission. 

TCOLE Presents: Education Services

The Education Services presentation will focus on creating, presenting, and maintaining educational materials.  The program topics include building effective learning objectives, the differences between an instructor resource guide and a lesson plan, how to convert an in-person training lesson plan into e-learning, instructor roles and responsibilities, and much more!

Rethinking Strategies for Police Selection, Field Training, and Retention: The Game has Changed – Marshall Jones, Florida Institute of Technology

This interactive presentation explores contemporary issues and trends impacting police recruiting, field training outcomes, and retention. Current research will be explored highlighting shifting candidate-pool challenges requiring new approaches. Best practices will be reviewed related to recruiting strategies, selection processes, field training implementation, retention outcomes, and retirement transition. Major paradigm shifts in job requirements and agency policies will be presented. Challenges emerging from recent events, along with potential solutions, will be discussed.

TCOLE Presents: TCLEDDS for Agencies: Do’s and Don’ts – Richard Gutierrez and Lisa Landry

This presentation covers the fundamentals of form submission via TCLEDDS.  It is not a comprehensive step-by-step tutorial or “user manual” type of instruction, but rather an overview of the most common submission errors made by agency staff and the preventive measures to avoid them.  The program topics include how to do a PID number search and a PID application, how to search and submit training rosters, how to submit and search for L-1s and L-1Ts, understanding F-5 form submission prerequisites, and the F-5R form updates.

TCOLE Presents: Governments Relations: Navigating TLO and Legislative Updates

Each legislative session brings its share of changes and challenges, but there is no need for the process to be a mystery. This breakout will provide you with a foundation for where to look for the latest information, how to keep up with legislation as it works its way through the process, and how to get involved.

Texas Law Enforcement Peer Network Program: How it Developed and How it Works – B.J. Wagner, Senior Vice President of Health and Public Safety, Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute, Jeff Spivey, Executive Director of Caruth Police Institute Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute, and Dustin Schellenger, State Director of the Texas Law Enforcement Peer Network

The trauma associated with police work affects all police officers and has contributed to record high suicide rates across the state of Texas.  It has been proven time and again that peer support groups can drastically reduce these numbers.  Despite these facts, 70 percent of police departments in Texas have no peer network or mental health resources.  The Texas Law Enforcement Peer Network was created to provide statewide peer support and culturally competent resources to officers no matter where they are in the State, while prioritizing their anonymity.   This presentation will cover the history, development, structure, training, and resources of the Texas Law Enforcement Peer Network.

Link Between Officer Safety and Nutrition – Texas Department of Public Safety, Fitness Wellness Unit

The 6th Pillar of 21st Century Strategic Recommendations for Policing focuses on Officer Safety and Wellness. With an emphasis within law enforcement on command presence and de-escalation techniques, nutrition can play a vital role. Proper nutritional education can help ensure that officers are appropriately fueled for performance and recovery in addition to having the knowledge needed to lose weight as well as maintain weight. Finding the right strategies to implement a sound nutritional plan can be difficult within law enforcement due to the dynamic and unpredictable components of the job. However, there are simple strategies that can be implemented.

VINCIBLE: Stop the Killing/Stop the Dying –In Our Own Ranks – Chief Stan Standridge, San Marcos Police Department

ZERO.  The number zero does not have its own Roman numeral.  Instead, the word “nulla” was used by medieval scholars in lieu of zero.  It can mean vain or pointless. With that said, the State of Texas and its law enforcement departments desire zero line of duty deaths…and as soon as that is said, doubt and cynicism gain ground.  It seems pointless to suggest this huge state could have zero line of duty deaths. 

Badges have been worn by the law enforcement community as an emblem of legal authority and as a sign to honor and to protect the communities they serve. Unfortunately, for many officers, badges have also been viewed as a guard from danger, injury, or even death. In those officers’ minds, badges make them invincible. 

 This class focuses on the core question: what does Different Look Like for Texas?  Welcome to the conversation; we have work to do!

TCOLE Presents: TCLEDDS for Academies: Do’s and Don’ts – Richard Gutierrez and Lisa Landry

This presentation covers the fundamentals of form submission via TCLEDDS.  It is not a comprehensive step-by-step tutorial or “user manual” type of instruction, but rather an overview of the most common submission errors made by agency staff and the preventive measures to avoid them.  The program topics include how to do a PID number search and a PID application, how to search and submit training rosters, how to submit and search for L-1s and L-1Ts, understanding F-5 form submission prerequisites, and the F-5R form updates.

Resilience – Texas Department of Public Safety, Fitness Wellness Unit

This course examines basic resiliency principles along with strategies and techniques to improve the officer’s response to stressors. This course will discuss topics such as the fixed mindset versus the growth mindset, the Texas Department of Public Safety Resiliency Domains and Tenets, and tactical breathing to regulate the physiological symptoms associated with the stress response.  In this class learn the positive impact resilience training can have on an officer while at work as well as off duty.

Evaluating Reality-Based Training – Lieutenant James Molloy, Austin Community College

Often, when conducting reality-based training, instructors rely on simple check list style performance evaluations. This is an effective tool to record observations, but in most cases does not actively involve the student in the process. By engaging students in a Socratic evaluation of the exercise instructors will actively engage the student in the evaluation process, enhancing critical thinking, recall, and articulation skills.

Incorporating the “objective reasonableness” Graham v. Connor standard into every exercise will further cause students to evaluate situations based on the Constitutional use of force. In truth, nearly every contact with the public requires law enforcement to continually evaluate their legal basis for force, if any, and what the articulable facts are surrounding those decisions. Using guided questioning and requiring students to state facts rather than conclusions will enhance the ability to make better decisions in the future along with providing a basis for writing clear reports.

This class will cover the use of student-centered feedback, common feedback errors, the benefits of student-centered feedback, and the incorporation of Constitutional use of force into the evaluation process.

PTSD and Modern Brain Science – Lieutenant Paul Christ, Texas Municipal League Intergovernmental Risk Pool and Rick Randall, Senior Chaplain, The Randall Group

This course educates police officers and leaders to the issue of trauma and how it impacts the brain, often resulting in injury to the brain and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and impulsive behavior. The goal is to address potential risks to officers to prevent them from becoming issues for the individual, their family, and the department. Using the CISM model, the value of early intervention strategies is described and recommended as effective prevention. 

TCOLE Presents: Background Investigations and Secure Share

Do you conduct background investigations for your agency’s applicant pool? Are you responsible for the final hiring decision at your agency? Come to our class where we will discuss Senate Bill 24 as it relates to background investigations, the Background Confirmation Form, and TCOLE Secure Share. Think you already know all there is to know about these topics? Think again! Not only will we discuss these topics as they stand now, but we will also cover the vision of where these projects are headed.